Validity of Certification

| March 20, 2013

I recently got the following question about a blog post I did back in 2009 – OHSAS 18001 “Governing Body”.

The question was –

My company is an Environmental Laboratory in India.  It holds an unaccredited certificate issued by an Indian company.  Can you clarify how far this certificate is valid.

My response –

I can’t answer your question since the answer is specific to your organization, the clients you conduct work for and the laws of your jurisdiction.  For example, in the United States, there are laws that require testing laboratories to be accredited – including those doing certain environmental tests.

As I mentioned in the blog post you referenced, management system standards are used for a variety of different purposes.

One of those purposes is to set out the requirements upon which certification programs are based.  Some of these certifications are reputable and legitimate, whether they are accredited or not.  Others are only sham certifications.  They are issued primarily to deceive or encourage reliance on the part of third parties that is not justified based on the level of investigation actually being performed by the individual or organization providing the certification.

The issue is not so much accreditation or not.  The issue is the credibility of the certification based on the level of due diligence that supports the determination being made.

I posted this question and response because of the increased interest and reliance on OHSMS certification that is being driven by an increase in public sustainability reporting.  It is important to understand that certification alone does not represent due diligence unless it is clear exactly what assessment activities were done to support the certification.

© ENLAR Compliance Services, Inc. (2013)

Category: FAQ, Standards & Certification

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